Philosophy

“My work is a reflection of myself. My execution of martial arts technique is also a reflection of myself. In whatever productive work I do, I will create a masterpiece. It will reflect my genius and virtuosity. In all things, I will work most seriously, intelligently and wholeheartedly. To it, I commit my soul, my body and spirit, and even my whole life’s fortune. I am a doer, a venturer, a winner.” – Louisville TaeKwonDo Family Center Student Creed

My commitment to you:tkd

My passion for taekwondo galvanized me to earn a third degree black belt. At least three days a week I go to practice, and at the beginning of class, we recite the above creed to inspire our work. While I know of no specific mediator’s creed, these principles also inform my professional life.

I believe you have certain expectations that should be fulfilled when you employ my services. At the most basic level, and as required by the Model Standards of Conduct developed by the AAA, ABA and ACR, you are entitled to a mediator who is impartial, competent, free from conflicts of interest, bound to maintain confidentiality and works to maintain the quality of the process.

I believe, however, you are entitled to more than the basics. You should demand a mediator who is empathetic, attentive and hard working. You should demand a mediator who can be patient as well as persistent, has a pre-mediation command of the issues, and actively pushes all sides to reexamine their positions when required. You should demand a mediator who can communicate with people from all walks of life and is willing to listen (because she actually enjoys attorneys). You should demand a mediator who is committed to the process and will work seriously, intelligently and wholeheartedly to get the job done. That is the type of mediator I strive to be.

A few words about arbitration vs. mediation:

Because attorneys must arbitrate some cases, I offer that service, but only in commercial cases. I much prefer mediation. Serving as a mediator is oft times more challenging, because the only power I hold is the power of persuasion, but I think it provides better outcomes and allows the disputing parties more control than does arbitration.